Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 — Reduced Conflict Intersection

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About the project

We are planning construction on Hwy 14 from east of Hwy 56 in Dodge Center to west of Co. Rd. 5 / 2nd Ave. in Byron. The project will improve safety and mobility by:

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Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 intersection

The Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 intersection has a high risk for severe crashes. The multi-lane crossing and high traffic speeds contribute to the risk.Photo of the Hwy 14/Co. Rd. 9 intersectionExisting Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 intersection looking north Building a reduced conflict intersection will help mitigate the risk for severe crashes. Learn more about reduced conflict intersections.

Public involvement

Public input will help us:

  • Understand issues and needs at the intersection
  • Assess improvements or alternatives that meet the needs of all highway users

You can help by:





About the project

We are planning construction on Hwy 14 from east of Hwy 56 in Dodge Center to west of Co. Rd. 5 / 2nd Ave. in Byron. The project will improve safety and mobility by:

View full-size map

Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 intersection

The Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 intersection has a high risk for severe crashes. The multi-lane crossing and high traffic speeds contribute to the risk.Photo of the Hwy 14/Co. Rd. 9 intersectionExisting Hwy 14 and Co. Rd. 9 intersection looking north Building a reduced conflict intersection will help mitigate the risk for severe crashes. Learn more about reduced conflict intersections.

Public involvement

Public input will help us:

  • Understand issues and needs at the intersection
  • Assess improvements or alternatives that meet the needs of all highway users

You can help by:





  • September Public Meeting

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    Public meeting materials

    Please review the materials presented at the public meeting on September 20, 2022, in Dodge Center and complete a survey to share your feedback.

    Crashes

    In the past ten years, there have been 18 crashes at County Road 9

    Crash pie chart showing 42% or 5 angle crashes including 1 fatality and 2 injuries all involving southbound motorists, 25% or 3 rear-end crashes with 1 injury, 25% or 3 sideswipe crashes, and 1 left turn crash

    Among the 18 crashes:

    • Three were north of Highway 14 at the railroad crossing
    • Three were run off the road, not specific to the intersection

    Crossing or turning left across oncoming traffic is the number one risk at intersections like Highway 14 and County Road 9. This type of crossing has more conflict points, which leads to more frequent and severe crashes.

    Reduced conflict intersection

    What is an RCI?

    Reduced Conflict Intersections (RCIs) are intersections that decrease fatalities and injuries. With an RCI, drivers from the side street only have to be concerned with one direction of traffic on the highway at a time. You don't need to wait for a gap in both directions to cross a major road.

    What are the benefits?

    Improved safety: Studies show an 86 percent reduction in fatalities and a 46 percent reduction in injury crashes where RCIs are used.

    Faster to build: RCIs can be designed and built in approximately one year. Interchanges typically take 3-5 years.

    Lower cost: RCIs are often less expensive than constructing an intersection with a stop light and are a fraction of the cost of building an interchange.

    How are they used?

    Motorists approaching divided highways from a side street are not allowed to make left turns or cross; instead, they will turn right onto the highway and then make a U-turn at a designated median opening. This reduces potential conflict points and increases safety.

    Conflict diagram showing 4 critical right-angle and 6 turning/merging conflict points in the existing condition and only 6 turning/merging conflict points in a reduced conflict intersection

    Design alternative 1

    Features:

    • Fewer potential conflict points
    • Increased safety

    From Highway 14: Motorists approaching from Highway 14 are allowed to make left turns onto County Road 9.

    From County Road 9: Motorists approaching Highway 14 from County Road 9 are not allowed to turn left at the intersection where they do today. Instead, motorists will turn right into a wide left turn lane and then make a U-turn at a designated median opening.

    Design alternative 1 showing the median u-turns, left turns allowed from Hwy 14 to County Road 9, and aggregate shoulder to accommodate larger vehicles

    Design alternative 1 turn movements

    Design alternative 1 turn movement diagrams showing 65-foot semi-truck turn movements through the RCI

    Design alternative 2

    Features:

    • Fewer potential conflict points
    • Increased safety

    From Highway 14: Motorists approaching from Highway 14 are not allowed to make left turns onto County Road 9. Instead, they are required to make a U-turn at a designated median opening.

    From County Road 9: Motorists approaching Highway 14 from County Road 9 are not allowed to turn left at the intersection where they do today. Instead, motorists will turn right into a wide left turn lane and then make a U-turn at a designated median opening.

    Design alternative 2 showing the median u-turns, left turns not allowed from Highway 14 to County Road 9, and aggregate shoulder to accommodate larger vehicles


    Design alternative 2 turn movements

    Design alternative 2 turn movement diagrams showing 65-foot semi-truck turn movements through the RCI

    Sight distance

    Both design alternatives 1 and 2 allow for more than the required sight distance.

    What is sight distance? Sight distance is the distance along the road a person can see an object that is a specified height above the road. As sight distance gets shorter, drivers become less certain that it is safe to pull out onto the road.

    How much sight distance is needed? The rule of thumb we use is the distance an oncoming vehicle travels in 10 seconds. For a 70 MPH design, that distance is 1,029’. The drawings here show the sight distance for a passenger car (where the driver’s eye is 3.5’ above the ground) and a semi-truck (the driver’s eye is 7.6’ above the ground) and they want to see the windshield of an approaching car (3.5’ above ground).

    Sight distance diagram showing driver sight distance meets and exceeds required minimum sight distance

    Animation video

    Animation video showing truck and agricultural vehicle movements through the RCI. NOTE: Vehicle speeds in the video have been proportionally reduced for viewing.


  • Watch a video recording of the June 28, 2022 virtual public meeting

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Page last updated: 06 Oct 2022, 08:24 AM